HOME
TheInfoList



The Princeton School of Public and International Affairs (formerly the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) is a professional
public policy school Public Policy schools are typically university programs which teach students policy analysis, policy studies, public policy, political economy, urban planning, public administration, public affairs, and public management. Public policy schools typi ...
at
Princeton University Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one o ...
. The school provides an array of comprehensive coursework in the fields of
international development International development or global development is a broad concept denoting the idea that societies and countries have differing levels of "development" on an international scale. It is the basis for international classifications such as develop ...
,
foreign policy ''Foreign Policy'' is an American news publication, founded in 1970 and focused on global affairs, current events, and domestic and international policy. It produces content daily on its website, and in six print issues annually. ''Foreign Polic ...
,
science Science (from the Latin word ''scientia'', meaning "knowledge") is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe."... modern science is a discovery as w ...
and
technology Technology ("science of craft", from Greek , ''techne'', "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and , ''-logia'') is the sum of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectiv ...
, and
economics Economics () is the social science that studies how people interact with value; in particular, the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Economics focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and ...
and
finance Finance is the study of financial institutions, financial markets and how they operate within the financial system. It is concerned with the creation and management of money and investments. Savers and investors have money available which could ...
through its undergraduate (AB) degrees, graduate
Master of Public Affairs The Master of Public Affairs (M.P.Aff., M.P.A. or MPA), one of several public affairs degrees, historically has been a master level professional degree offered in public policy schools that provides training in public policy and the operation of go ...
(MPA),
Master of Public Policy The Master of Public Policy (MPP/MAPP), alternatively Master of Science in Public Policy or Master of Arts in Public Policy, is one of several public policy degrees. It is a master's-level professional degree that provides training in policy analys ...
(MPP), and PhD degrees. Since 2012,
Cecilia Rouse Cecilia Elena Rouse ( ; born December18, 1963) is an American economist currently serving as the 30th Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers. She is the first African American to hold this position. Prior to this, she served as the dean of the ...
has been dean of the Princeton School. The school is consistently ranked as one of the best institutions for the study of international relations and public affairs in the country and in the world. ''Foreign Policy'' ranks the Princeton School as No. 2 in the world for
International Relations#REDIRECT International relations#REDIRECT International relations {{Redirect category shell, 1= {{R from other capitalisation ...
{{Redirect category shell, 1= {{R from other capitalisation ...
at the undergraduate and PhD levels, behind the
Harvard Kennedy School The Harvard Kennedy School (also known as the John F. Kennedy School of Government and HKS) is the public policy school of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The school offers master's degrees in public policy, public administration, ...
.


History

In 1930, Princeton University established the School of Public and International Affairs, which was originally meant to serve as an interdisciplinary program for undergraduate students in Princeton's liberal arts college. In 1948, the School added a graduate professional program and was renamed to honor
Woodrow Wilson Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856February 3, 1924) was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921. A member of the Democratic Party, Wilson served as the president of Pri ...
, who was the 13th president of the University, governor of
New Jersey New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware R ...
and the 28th president of the United States. In two of Wilson's speeches at the University – first during its 150th anniversary celebration in 1896 and again at his inauguration as the University's president in 1902 – he mentioned “Princeton in the nation’s service.” This phrase serves as the basis for the University's unofficial motto, which was amended in 2016 to "Princeton in the nation's service and in the service of humanity." In 2015, student protesters forced Princeton to reconsider having the School named after Wilson due to his racist views, of which they disapproved. The Wilson Legacy Review Committee ultimately decided to keep his name attached to the School, noting that, like many other notable figures from American history, Wilson had a "complex legacy of both positive and negative repercussions". On June 26, 2020, following the eruption of
George Floyd protests The George Floyd protests are an ongoing series of police brutality protests that began in Minneapolis in the United States on May 26, 2020. The civil unrest and protests began as part of international responses to the killing of George Floyd, ...
and the resurgence of the
Black Lives Matter Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a decentralized political and social movement protesting against incidents of police brutality and all racially motivated violence against black people. While there are specific organizations such as the Black Live ...
movement, the Princeton University Board of Trustees decided to rename the Woodrow Wilson School the "Princeton School of Public and International Affairs,” citing Wilson's "racist thinking and policies
hat A collection of 18th and 19th century men's beaver felt hats A hat is a head covering which is worn for various reasons, including protection against weather conditions, ceremonial reasons such as university graduation, religious reasons, safety ...
make him an inappropriate namesake for a school or college whose scholars, students, and alumni must stand firmly against racism in all its forms." It was also announced that Wilson College, the first of Princeton's six undergraduate residential colleges, will be renamed First College. Woodrow Wilson opposed admitting African-American students to Princeton, and introduced racial segregation into the
United States federal civil service The United States federal civil service is the civilian workforce (i.e., non-elected and non-military public sector employees) of the United States federal government's departments and agencies. The federal civil service was established in 1871 (). ...
as President.


Founding

On February 23, 1930, the front page of the Sunday New York Times announced:
Princeton Founds Statesmen’s School – Institution Will Train Youths for Public Life and Will Stress Internationalism – Hoover Hails The Project. De W.C. Poole Quits Diplomatic Service to Be Its Liaison Officer With World Affairs. The establishment of a school of public and international affairs at Princeton University was announced today by President John Grier Hibben in his annual message to the National Alumni Association. The school’s primary purpose is to train young men for public life and to equip them—and others—with a broad sense of "the fundamentals of citizenship."
President Hibben made the announcement in Naussau Hall, "where in 1783 George Washington received the thanks of the Continental Congress for his conduct of the Revolutionary War." De Witt Clinton Poole, a noted foreign service officer and "until recently counselor of the United States Embassy in Berlin" had been the prime advocate for the creation of the school. The next year in August of 1931, the Fédération Interalliée des Anciens (FIDAC), the most influential international veterans association of the interwar period (representing nine million allied veterans), chose Princeton to receive its educational medal for promoting world peace and understanding.


Academics


Undergraduate program

The school stresses a multidisciplinary approach to policy studies with undergraduate students at the Princeton School taking courses in at least four disciplines including economics, history, politics, psychology, sociology, and science policy. In their junior year, students must enroll in and complete a Policy Task Force, which addresses a specific public policy issue. Students conduct research, propose recommendations, and issue final reports. Students are also allowed to work towards certificates in an array of fields, including Global Health and Health Policy,
Urban Studies Urban studies is based on the study of the urban development of cities. This includes studying the history of city development from an architectural point of view, to the impact of urban design on community development efforts. The core theoretical ...
, and the History and the Practice of Diplomacy.


Master's degrees

The two-year MPA program prepares students for international and domestic policy careers. All second-year MPA students must complete a Policy Workshop, which emphasizes policy implementation. Through the graduate policy workshops, students conduct field-based research and present their research and recommendations to clients. Students also develop analytical and quantitative skills through coursework emphasizing the political, economic, and behavioral aspects of complex policy issues. MPA candidates may select one of four fields of concentration: *
International Relations#REDIRECT International relations#REDIRECT International relations {{Redirect category shell, 1= {{R from other capitalisation ...
{{Redirect category shell, 1= {{R from other capitalisation ...
*
International Development International development or global development is a broad concept denoting the idea that societies and countries have differing levels of "development" on an international scale. It is the basis for international classifications such as develop ...
*
Domestic Policy Domestic policy are administrative decisions that are directly related to all issues and activity within a state's borders. It differs from foreign policy, which refers to the ways a government advances its interests in external politics. Domestic ...
* Economics and Public Policy The one-year MPP program is designed for mid-career professionals, PhD research scientists, lawyers, and physicians who are involved in international and domestic public policy.


Doctoral degrees

The PhD in Public Affairs focuses on two research areas: security studies; and science, technology and environmental policy. The School works with other departments at the University to offer a Joint Degree Program that combines work in a social science with a multidisciplinary perspective on economics problems. Graduate students also have the opportunity to pursue certificates in demography; health and health policy; science, technology and environmental policy; and urban policy/urban policy and planning. In addition to the MPA, MPP and PhD degrees, the School offers a four-year MPA/J.D. program, and has formal joint degree arrangements with law schools at
Columbia University Columbia University (also known as Columbia, and officially as Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in New York City. Established in 1754 on the grounds of Trinity Church in Manhattan, Columb ...
,
New York University New York University (NYU) is a private research university in New York City. Chartered in 1831 by the New York State Legislature, NYU was founded by a group of New Yorkers led by then Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin. In 1832, the i ...
and
Stanford University , mottoeng = "The wind of freedom blows" , type = Private research university , academic_affiliations = AAUSpace-grant , established = , founder = Leland and Jane Stanford , endowment = $27.7 billion (2019)As of August 31, 2019. , budget = $6.6 ...
. Students often refer to the Princeton School by its colloquial abbreviation, "SPIA". The school also offers a Joint Degree Program (JDP) in Social Policy, allowing students to take courses in the departments of politics, psychology, sociology, and economics.


Robertson Hall

In 1961, Charles ’26 and Marie Robertson provided a gift to expand the graduate school. Their gift funded the construction of the School’s current home, designed by
Minoru Yamasaki was an American architect, best known for designing the original World Trade Center in New York City and several other large-scale projects. Yamasaki was one of the most prominent architects of the 20th century. He and fellow architect Edward Du ...
, who also designed New York's original
World Trade Center World Trade Centers are sites recognized by the World Trade Centers Association. World Trade Center may refer to: Buildings * List of World Trade Centers * World Trade Center (2001–present), a building complex that includes five skyscrapers, a ...
. To the north of the building is James FitzGerald's ''Fountain of Freedom'' (1966). "Before construction could begin n Robertson the building that had housed the School since 1952, then called Woodrow Wilson School Annex, had to be relocated." In May after two months of preparation, "the 3-story, L-shaped, 7,000,000-pound building was moved 296 feet in 12 hours by 38 men and 9 hydraulic jacks..." The Annex, renamed Corwin Hall, subsequently housed the Department of Political Science and Center of International Studies. The new structure, completed in the fall of 1965, was originally named Woodrow Wilson Hall, but was "renamed Robertson Hall in 1988 to honor its benefactors” and as President Goheen characterized upon its completion, was "a fit embodiment and expression of the high aspiration we hold for the " In approximately 2005, the SPIA established the Bernstein Gallery in Robertson Hall. The gallery “presents art exhibitions to stimulate thinking about contemporary policy issues and to enable understanding the world beyond the power of words. Each year, six curated shows are presented… and…are complemented by …panel discussions with experts from Princeton University, the School and outside organizations." The exhibits are "…Integrated with the School’s multidisciplinary approach…to enhance the impact of the course curriculum and to deepen people’s commitment to the ideals of public service." A retrospective of political art was held in 2017. The lower level lobby and gallery are named for Marver Bernstein, SPIA’s first dean and his wife, Sheva. Bernstein participated in Robertson’s architectural selection process and his wife, and interior designer, participated in its mid-century modern interior. In 2012, the Princeton University Art Museum announced the installation of the “Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads” exhibit by Chinese artist
Ai Weiwei Ai Weiwei (Chinese: 艾未未; pinyin: ''Ài Wèiwèi'', English pronunciation (help·info); born 28 August 1957) is a Chinese contemporary artist and activist. Ai grew up in the far north-west of China, where he lived under harsh conditions d ...

Ai Weiwei
on Scudder Plaza. In 2019–2020 Robertson Hall underwent a major renovation of its "offices, work areas, and gathering spaces" to provide more open, collaborative spaces. The exterior, auditorium, and lower-level classrooms were largely unchanged.


Centers and programs

The Princeton School has 19 unique centers and programs: * Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (CRCW) * Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies (CACPS) * Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHW) *
Center for Information Technology Policy The Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) at Princeton University is a leading interdisciplinary research center, dedicated to exploring the intersection of technology, engineering, public policy, and the social sciences. Faculty, studen ...
(CITP) * Center for International Security Studies (CISS) * Center for the Study of Democratic Politics (CSDP) * China and the World Program (CWP) * Education Research Section (ERS) * Innovations for Successful Societies (Institutions for Fragile States) * Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance (JRC) * Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination (LISD) * Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance (NCGG) *
Office of Population Research The Office of Population Research (OPR) at Princeton University is the oldest population research center in the United States. Founded in 1936, the OPR is a leading demographic research and training center. Recent research activity has primarily fo ...
(OPR) * Princeton Survey Research Center (SRC) * Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) * Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (STEP) * Program on Science and Global Security (SGS) * Research Program in Development Studies (RPDS) * Research Program in Political Economy (RPPE) PolicyNet is a network of prominent public policy schools around the world, founded in 2005 as a joint venture between the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the
Centre for International Governance Innovation The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI, pronounced "see-jee") is an independent, non-partisan think tank on global governance. CIGI supports research, forms networks, advances policy debate and generates ideas for multilateral go ...
for interaction and collaboration on issues of common interest, curricular programs, joint research projects and other activities. The school is a full member of the
Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) is a non-profit educational organization of graduate schools of international affairs, with 38 members around the world. Starting as a network of American graduate schools i ...
(APSIA), a group of schools of public policy, public administration, and international studies.


Notable alumni

* Bob Abernethy, television journalist * Steve Adler, Mayor of
Austin, Texas Austin (, ) is the capital city of the U.S. state of Texas, as well as the seat and largest city of Travis County, with portions extending into Hays and Williamson counties. Incorporated on December 27, 1839, it is the 11th-most populous cit ...
*
Samuel Alito Samuel Anthony Alito Jr. ( ; born April 1, 1950) is an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was nominated by President George W. Bush on October 31, 2005, and has served since January 31, 2006. He is the second Italia ...
, Associate Justice of the
Supreme Court of the United States The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States of America. It has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal and state court cases that invo ...

Supreme Court of the United States
* Nicholas Allard, Dean and President of
Brooklyn Law School Brooklyn Law School (BLS) is a private law school in New York City. Founded in 1901, it has approximately 1,100 students. Brooklyn Law School's faculty includes 60 full-time faculty, 15 emeriti faculty, and a number of adjunct faculty. Brooklyn ...
* Hady Amr, deputy assistant administrator, Bureau for the Middle East, U.S. Agency for International Development, former director, Brookings Doha Center, Brookings Institution * Jeremy Ben-Ami, former domestic policy adviser to President Bill Clinton and President of the Pro-Israel, Pro-Peace lobby, J Street (advocacy group), J Street * Joshua B. Bolten, former White House Chief of Staff; former director of the Office of Management and Budget under George W. Bush * Kit Bond, former United States Senate, U.S. Senator from Missouri, former Governor of Missouri * Brendan Byrne, former Governor of New Jersey * Simon Carcagno, professional rower for the U.S. National team * Frank Carlucci, former United States Secretary of Defense, Secretary of Defense * Barbara Cassani, founder of Go Fly and leader of London, London's successful bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics * Steven Colloton, judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit * Edward F. Cox, lawyer * Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator from Texas, former Solicitor General of Texas * Mitch Daniels, former Governor of Indiana, former director of the Office of Management and Budget under George W. Bush * Joseph Fichera, founder and CEO of Saber Partners, Auction rate security, auction rate securities expert. * Bill Frist, former U.S. Senator from Tennessee, former Party leaders of the United States Senate, Senate Majority Leader * Nellie Gorbea, Secretary of State of Rhode Island * Robert L. Gordon III, former U.S. Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy * Mohsin Hamid, author of ''The Reluctant Fundamentalist'' * Michael Huerta, Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, former Managing Director of the 2002 Winter Olympics held in Salt Lake City, Utah * Timothy Hwang, founder and CEO of FiscalNote * James A. Johnson (businessman), James A. Johnson, former chairman of Fannie Mae and Democratic "wise man" * Robert L. Johnson, founder of BET * Nicholas Katzenbach, former United States Attorney General * Wendy Kopp, founder of Teach for America * Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, former President of Peru * Anthony Lake, executive director of UNICEF, former National Security Advisor (United States), National Security Advisor (1993–1997) * Leonard Lance, U.S. Representative for New Jersey's 7th District * David J. Lane (ambassador), David J. Lane, U.S. Ambassador and former philanthropy executive * William J. Lynn III, William Lynn, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense * Susan L. Marquis, Frank and Marcia Carlucci Dean of the Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School and vice president, innovation, RAND Corporation; chair of the PSPIA Advisory Council * David McCormick, former Under Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs * Mike McCurry (press secretary), Mike McCurry, former White House Press Secretary under Bill Clinton * Jeff Merkley, U.S. Senator from Oregon, former Speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives * Judith Miller (journalist), Judith Miller, former reporter for ''The New York Times'', covered the Plame affair * Ralph Nader, consumer protection lawyer, author and political activist * Joseph S. Nye, Jr., former Dean (education), dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University * Michael E. O'Hanlon, senior fellow at The Brookings Institution * Robert C. Orr, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Policy Coordination and Strategic Planning * David Petraeus, David H. Petraeus, United States Army General (United States), General Commander, International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and Commander, U.S. Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A), and former director of the Central Intelligence Agency * Stuart J. Rabner, Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court * Asha Rangappa, director of admissions and a senior lecturer at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs * Chuck Reed, mayor of San Jose, California * Chip Reid, national correspondent, CBS News * Graham Richard, mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana * Anthony Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union * William Rusher, publisher, National Review * John P. Sarbanes, U.S. Representative for Maryland's 3rd District * Paul Sarbanes, former U.S. Senator from Maryland * Michael H. Schill, President of the University of Oregon, and former Dean of UCLA School of Law and the University of Chicago Law School * Terri A. Sewell, U.S. Representative for Alabama's 7th District * Janmejaya Sinha, Chairman, Asia-Pacific, Boston Consulting Group * George P. Shultz, former United States Secretary of State, Secretary of State, former United States Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of the Treasury, former United States Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Labor * P. W. Singer, senior fellow, director, 21st Century Defense Initiative, Brookings Institution * Anne-Marie Slaughter, former Director of Policy Planning, United States Department of State , former Dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs * Bob Taft, former Governor of Ohio * John Turitzin, vice-president, Marvel Entertainment * Paul Volcker, former Chairman of the Federal Reserve * Brady Walkinshaw, state legislator in Washington (state), Washington


Faculty

Nearly all full-time Princeton School faculty members have dual appointments with other departments at the university. The school also has visiting professors, lecturers, and practitioners from the world of public and international affairs that teach. Faculty members at the School include Nobel Laureates, Pulitzer Prize winners, a university president, and former ambassadors. Nobel Laureates include Angus Deaton, Daniel Kahneman, Paul Krugman, and W. Arthur Lewis, Arthur Lewis.


Controversy

In July of 2002, dissenting family members of the Robertson Foundation board, which was established initially by a $35 million gift in 1961, filed suit seeking to more narrowly focus the SPIA curriculum on training for careers in government and public service vs. Princeton’s broader conception of "public affairs" which “embraces some non-government activities, for example, certain types of work in journalism, in private foundations, and in business, labor and consumer organizations."


References


External links

* * * {{coord, 40.34835, -74.65467, type:edu_globe:earth_region:US-NJ, display=title 1930 establishments in New Jersey Educational institutions established in 1930 Presidential schools in the United States Princeton University Public administration schools in the United States Public policy schools Schools of international relations in the United States Name changes due to the George Floyd protests